Pointers

Tcl
Tk
Expect
PVM
gdb
Program slicing
Strassen's algorithm

Tcl

Tcl stands for Tool Command Language (pronounced ``tickle''). It is a fairly simple and straight forward computer language similar to a shell language. It was created by
John Ousterhout, now working at Sun Microsystems. As a scripting language, Tcl is similar to UNIX shell languages such as the Bourne Shell (sh), the C shell (csh), the Korn Shell (ksh) and Perl. Tcl supports many of the features of conventional procedural languages, including variable assignment, procedure calls and control structures. There are a number of extensions to Tcl. Most of these include a C library providing new functionality, and a Tcl interpreter for the library. The most commonly used of these libraries is Tk.

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Tk

Tk is a set of libraries that can be used by a string oriented computer language such as Tcl to draw X-windows ``widgets'' such as lists, boxes, menus, etc. Tk adds about 35 different Tcl commands that lets you create and manipulate widgets in a graphical user interface. One can access the Tk extensions to Tcl using the shell program wish.

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Expect

Expect is an extension wrapped around Tcl. It gives Tcl a number of new commands that helps the user control interactive programs. That is, a script can record output from a program and give the program input according to the output. Thus it is possible to connect several programs together to interact with each other. For example, one can have two instances of a chess program play each other. This should be compared to standard UNIX programs, that are usually designed to be connected in an unidirectional interprocess channel (i.e. pipes).

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PVM

PVM stands for Parallel Virtual Machine. It consists of an integrated set of software tools and libraries that emulates a general purpose heterogeneous concurrent computing framework on interconnected computers of varied architecture.

The PVM system contains two main parts. The first is a daemon that resides on all computers making up the virtual machine. One of the jobs for the daemon is to preserve the consistency of the parallel virtual machine. The second part of the system is a library of PVM interface routines. This library contains user callable routines for message passing, spawning processes, coordinating and modifying the virtual machine. The PVM system can be used with C, C++ and Fortran. It supports both functional parallelism and data parallelism (SPMD).

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GDB

gdb is the GNU debugger. (The free software foundation) It is a replacement (or complement) to dbx. The purpose of a debugger such as GDB is to allow you to see what is going on ``inside'' another program while it executes. It can also be used to inspect what a program was doing when it crashed.

The following list shows what GDB can do to help you catch bugs in the act:

GDB can be used to debug programs in C and C++.

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Program Slicing

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The dissertations of
Hsin Pan and Hiralal Agrawal are available online.

There exists an extensive list of references and pointers on program slicing.

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