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Current Trends for 4D Space-Time Topology for Semantic Flow Segmentation

Kresimir Matkovic, Alan Lez, Helwig Hauser, Armin Pobitzer , Holger Theisel, Alexander Kuhn, Mathias Otto, Ronald Peikert, Benjamin Schindler, Raphael Fuchs

ARTICLE, Procedia Computer Science, 2011

Abstract

Recent advances in computing and simulation technology promote the simulation of time-dependent flows, i.e., flows where the velocity field changes over time. The simulation of time-dependent flow is a more realistic approximation of natural phenomena and it represents an invaluable tool for scientists and practitioners in multiple disciplines, including meteorology, vehicle design, and medicine. Flow visualization, a subfield of scientific visualization, is one of several research areas which deal with the analysis of flows. There are many methods for the analysis of steady flows, but the extension to the time-dependent case is not straight forward. The SemSeg project, a FET-Open project in the 7th Framework programme, attempts to provide a solution for the semantic segmentation of time-dependent flows. It aims at the formulation of a sound theoretical mechanism to describe structural features in time-dependent flow. In this paper, we briefly summarize recent research results from the SemSeg project. Several different approaches are pursued in the project, including methods based on the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE), methods based on vector field topology (VFT), and interactive visual analysis (IVA) methods. Uncertainty visualization and the interactive evaluation of methods are helping in evaluating the results.

Published

Procedia Computer Science

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BibTeX

@article{Matkovic11CurrentTrends,
 title = {Current Trends for 4D Space-Time Topology for Semantic Flow Segmentation},
 journal = {Procedia Computer Science},
 author = {Kresimir Matkovic and Alan Lez and Helwig Hauser and Armin Pobitzer 
  and Holger Theisel and Alexander Kuhn and Mathias Otto and Ronald Peikert and 
  Benjamin Schindler and Raphael Fuchs},
 abstract = {Recent advances in computing and simulation technology promote the simulation of
  time-dependent flows, i.e., flows where the velocity field changes over time. The simulation
  of time-dependent flow is a more realistic approximation of natural phenomena and it
  represents an invaluable tool for scientists and practitioners in multiple disciplines,
  including meteorology, vehicle design, and medicine. Flow visualization, a subfield of
  scientific visualization, is one of several research areas which deal with the analysis of
  flows. There are many methods for the analysis of steady flows, but the extension to the
  time-dependent case is not straight forward. The SemSeg project, a FET-Open project in the
  7th Framework programme, attempts to provide a solution for the semantic segmentation of
  time-dependent flows. It aims at the formulation of a sound theoretical mechanism to describe
  structural features in time-dependent flow. In this paper, we briefly summarize recent
  research results from the SemSeg project. Several different approaches are pursued in
  the project, including methods based on the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE), methods based
  on vector field topology (VFT), and interactive visual analysis (IVA) methods. Uncertainty
  visualization and the interactive evaluation of methods are helping in evaluating the results.},
 volume = {7},
 number = {0},
 pages = {253--255},
 year = {2011},
 note = {Proceedings of the 2nd European Future Technologies
         Conference and Exhibition 2011 (FET 11)},
 issn = {1877-0509},
 doi = {10.1016/j.procs.2011.09.013},
 url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877050911005734},


}






 Last Modified: Jean-Paul Balabanian, 2014-06-18